Tagged: writing-style

The brilliance of D. H. Lawrence: a pornographer or a genius?

I can’t bear art that you can walk round and admire. A book should be either a bandit or a rebel, or a man in the crowd. Writers are often perceived as strange people because of their lifestyle and sometimes because of their writing style. D. H. Lawrence was a British writer and poet who was regarded as one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. He was...

From real to pseudo

In the introduction to the book Aspects of the Novel, the author E. M. Forster says that his subject is to analyze the literary works written in English. He asks himself: can he ignore the prose written in other languages? He states, “as unpleasant and unpatriotic it sounds, the truth has to be faced. No English novelist is as great as Tolstoy – he has given a complete picture of...

Literature is not innocent

“When one sees one of my pictures, one asks oneself this simple question, “What does it mean?” It does not mean anything, because mystery means nothing either, it is unknowable,” said Rene Magritte about his painting The Lovers. As you understand, we’ll talk about surrealism, but not about Rene Magritte in particular, although he was one of the most plagiarized artists, the true surrealist with witty and unexpected ideas. Today I’d...

Author Interview – John W. Howell

We chatted with John W. Howell about his new novel Eternal Road: The final stop, the transformation of the heroes, and the meaning behind historical and supernatural elements. 1. What is the significance of the book’s title Eternal Road? The title came to me one day while I was writing one of the scenes. Eternal Road is the avenue to one’s selected spot to spend eternity. The road is well-traveled...

Aspects of the Novel

No book worth its salt is meant to put you to sleep, it’s meant to make you jump out of bed in your underwear and run and beat the author’s brains out. Bohumil Hrabal, Czech novelist There’s a book called Aspects of the Novel, a series of lectures from E. M. Forster, written in 1927. I haven’t read it myself yet, but I saw a mention about it in the...

Imagine a World Without Time

While I’m working on the formatting of So Absurd It Must Be True, Book 2 (yay! it’s almost here!), try to imagine this world… without time.  In Schrodinger’s famous thought experiment, he imagines a cat in a box with a flask of cyanide. The flask will be broken – and the cat poisoned – if an atom of radioactive material decays. We know that it will decay, but when is...

Shame-less by Nadia Bolz-Weber

(nonfiction) #takeawaykeys If we can share our story with someone who responds with empathy and understanding, shame can’t survive. Brené Brown, Daring Greatly Alert! Long post, if you can’t read it now, save for later! This book is for women who are almost-enough, who are struggling every day of their lives to be perfect, to deliver the image of the good mother, sexual goddess, ideal companion, and out-of-this-world-body. This book...

Book Review. The Lost Man, by Jane Harper

The great Australian poet Oodgeroo Noonuccal (or Kath Walker) turns 100 years this November. I’ve been thinking a lot about what she once said while reading Jane Harper’s novel The Lost Man. Kath Walker said, “Let no-one say the past is dead, the past is all about us and within.” What she means is that our past always affects our future. We are what we see, how we feel when we...