Tagged: absurdist-comedy

The Story of Harmless Bullet

/absurdist comedy/ Day 2 The Work At 7 am sharp, I was fully dressed for my morning adventure on the local bus. I waved goodbye to Margaret’s photo and cheerfully ran downstairs, pushing the unwelcome thoughts of reuniting with my ex to the back of my mind. The travel from West, a district where I lived after a nasty divorce, to the train station usually only took 28 minutes. I...

The Story of Harmless Bullet

  /absurdist comedy/ Day 1 The bridge It was July 12th, 2031. I stood on the Big Temptation’s narrow bridge, the collecting point for the national Meet a Stranger day. A slim woman with curly blonde hair and a floral dress passed by, more or less flying past me, only to stop near the handrails. She seemed to be overjoyed to breathe the same air as our passionate crowd, which...

Grotesque: abnormally large, shockingly ugly, distorted, and ludicrously odd

I have a remedy against thirst, quite contrary to that which is good against the biting of a mad dog. Keep running after a dog, and he will never bite you; drink always before the thirst, and it will never come upon you. François Rabelais, Gargantua and Pantagruel, book 1  Have you ever wondered what a grotesque world would look like? Is it a world where the laws of nature, symmetry,...

Book Cover

Book cover design is more important than ever, they say 😉✌️ And here is mine: If you’d like to know “WHAT MAKES AN ICONIC BOOK COVER?” – check HERE/link   Next post – Three spooky stories from Lagos 

Surreal Humor & Absurdist Comedy – Why Is It So Weird?

Written by Peter Manley When we think about comedy, there are so many different styles and “flavors” for us to choose from. For example, some of the most common forms of comedy – especially in the stand-up comedy realm – are anti-humor comedy (where a dry and otherwise unfunny statement is said out of indirect humor) and insult comedy, where the comedian directly makes fun of the audience or people...

The soul of Russian avant-garde

Today’s post is about the genius of Russian Absurd – Daniil Kharms (1905-1942). I am only interested in “nonsense”; only in that which makes no practical sense. I am interested in life, only in its absurd manifestations. #quote He is mostly known for his whimsical poems for children, but his heart belongs to absurd. His stories (or plots) are particularly fond of tantalising comic negations: the beginning that is not...