I write what I can write, when I can write it

What do you think about the title of this post? It does sound like you, doesn’t it? Well, why should you stress yourself with all that bloody writing when there are millions of amazing things online – movies about witches, horror series with zombies, historical romances to-die-for, political chats, blaming humanity tweets… Who is creating all this stuff? How do they do it? You don’t have a damn minute to make a sandwich, and here it is – voilà! New books/and series are arriving with the speed of a comet.

Ray Bradbury once said he doesn’t know what other writers are doing during the day if they can’t produce at least one story. I know EXACTLY what they are doing. Netflix and Instagram! 😂

I think there’s a method you can use if you wish one day to publish your remarkable story. We can call it writing-on-the-go-OR-in-the-moment, when an idea, all of a sudden, drops on your head. It means you are writing down only that particular piece/or conversation/or scene. It is usually 300-500 words, and it probably takes 10-20 minutes. 300 words multiplied by 365 days = two books. Or one book, but a huge one, like Ulysses.

Of course, as indie authors, we have to edit, format, market, or pay to edit, layout, design, distribute… I believe it takes more time than writing itself!
It doesn’t mean writing is more effortless. But to nail down a conversation or scene in the second it shows up in your head is the best you can do if you don’t have time to write.

Here you can argue and say: ah, all the best ideas are coming to me when I’m running through the forest, or driving my old truck, or jumping over benches-kids-heads to catch the last bus.

Hm. I think you should stop and transform your brilliant thoughts into words! Add that vital piece to your future bestseller!

You’d argue again and say: I don’t think I’ll ever become a bestseller, like ever…

Yeah, I feel the depressing vibe.
 Cheer up!

My answer would be: Do you know who Sherlock Holmes is? You do, right? The first two stories about Sherlock Holmes, written by Arthur Conan Doyle, left the readers cold. It wasn’t a great success. In fact, it wasn’t a success at all.

Or let me remind you about Vladimir Nabokov, who received many contrary and often puzzled reviews in his lifetime. Here are some examples – “it was torture”; “less than compelling”; “unreadable and false.” Did it stop him from becoming the greatest author of American and Russian literature?

You’d argue again… I guess you are the type who just loves to argue? 😉

Let’s embrace something in the writing process that keeps us going or keeps us interested. What do you love the most in a novel? Hero? Plot? Style? Structure? Maybe try to focus on that, your favorite detail; try to find a way to express your story that people will remember and love. Be a storyteller, a teacher, and an enchanter!

Lastly, I’d like to tell you a little secret. Tonight, precisely at 2 am, 😱 I’m going to visit your house and check how many words you’ve added to your belletristic project. Do not hide your laptop… it won’t stop Ray! Ever! 😬


Next post – What makes a great reader

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34 Responses

  1. masercot says:

    Anyone who thinks Nabokov is just Lolita is missing out on an entire universe…

    • Victoria Ray NB says:

      True 🙂 in Nabokov’s world 🌎 – words become more than a definition. They r also a color palette, a sketch, a mood…

  2. Hi Victoria. So happy to read you again.

    “We can call it writing-on-the-go-OR-in-the-moment, when an idea, all of a sudden, drops on your head. It means you are writing down only that particular piece/or conversation/or scene. It is usually 300-500 words, and it probably takes 10-20 minutes. 300 words multiplied by 365 days = two books. Or one book, but a huge one, like Ulysses.”
    The problem is that my ideas are 10-15 words long 😉

    I hope you are well hon.
    Sending hugs.

  3. I’m not arguing, just saying I’m not that productive. Sometimes I write a couple microfiction a day, but one story a day would be too ambicious. I wish.

    • Victoria Ray NB says:

      Well, we do the best we can 🙂

      Ah, & I wish, too… 😫😒 I’m often writing a lot during month or so, then drop for 1-2 months 🤦‍♀️

  4. Leon Stevens says:

    Great post!
    To quote myself, “I do my best writing when I am running or hurting. Often, that is the same time…” Some of my ideas come to me while I am out for a walk/run/bike ride.
    When I write, my stories usually come to a conclusion sooner rather than later. Most of them are under 1000 words, one being 175. Short attention span? Perhaps. Although my current project, a story based on one of my short sci-fi stories is inching towards 10 000, with no clear end – well, I know how it will end, just not the route.
    And yes, I try to write everyday. Does this count? Why not!

    • Victoria Ray NB says:

      Wow, so it might be a novella soon …
      And yes, often the best ideas arrive when we r outside 🙂 or walking. It triggers our creativity, I guess.
      Writing every day would be ideal, but “kitchen” calls lol 😂

      Good luck with the book/story!

  5. A lot of my best ideas come to me when I am sleeping. If I think that they are really good, I will jot them down so I don’t forget them and then go back to sleep.

  6. I loved this post,VR. I like the idea of a story a day. I do that for my blog since I post everyday. Not sure any of the stuff would make a book but I really like the direction you took. For your 2:00 AM visit I left the password to my Mac on a Post-it note right on top. Try not to wake Twiggy. She is very hard to get back to sleep once she hears a noise. 😁 👍 🥃

    • Victoria Ray NB says:

      Haha 😆 very caring, thank you John! I think I have to take some snacks for twiggy with me 😁, then it will be easier…

      And yes, if you r blogging every day it counts like writing because of all creativity & time you spend on the post/text/✍️👍🐕☀️

  7. Sorryless says:

    Spot on RNB. Herman Melville’s Moby Dick was trashed when it came out.

  8. alexraphael says:

    i wish I was as prolific as Ray Bradbury! Thanks for the inspring post.

  9. Nisha says:

    That was a fun and interesting post! Can relate this with some of the post ideas that come just out of the blue 🙂

  10. Jerry Laiche says:

    Great Post, always inspiritional.

  11. I like your math . . . “It is usually 300-500 words, and it probably takes 10-20 minutes. 300 words multiplied by 365 days = two books. Or one book, but a huge one, like Ulysses.” i really need to get off my ass and write more 🙂

  12. Inspiring post, Ray. If we can write/edit a little every day, we can accomplish a lot in a year. When creative lightning strikes, write it down!

    • Victoria Ray NB says:

      Sorry couldn’t answer earlier! Preparing a new book for publishing lol 😂

      And agreed with you!! 💜👋📖📖

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